Structure

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Beginning

The story begins by establishing the setting and by providing a backstory on the lottery:

The morning of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green. The people of the village began to gather in the square, between the post office and the bank around ten o’clock; in some towns there were so many people that…

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Middle

In the rising action, the backstory on the lottery is further developed: “The original paraphernalia for the lottery had been lost long ago, and the black box now resting on the stool had been put into use even before Old Man Warner, the oldest man in town, was born.” (p. 26, ll. 43-44, p. 27, l. 1)

The story also provides details on how the lottery evolved in this particular village. For example, we learn that Mr Summers changed the chips of wood which were traditionally used in the lottery with paper slips (p. 27, ll. 14-20). In the past, the official of the lottery would also chant (p. 27, l. 34) and perform a certai…

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Ending

The falling action shows the villagers picking up stones, which the story suggests is part of the lottery ritual: “Although the villagers had forgotten the ritual and lost the original black box, they still remembered to use stones” (p. 32, ll. 18-19).

In the resolution, Tessie Hutchinson screams in protest at the fate that awaits her, while the…

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